Science

PHYSICS – CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS:
In Physics, students learn essential concepts of physics through demonstrations, laboratory work, and discussion. Careful gathering and analysis of quantitative data is stressed. Some of the topics covered in this course are mechanics, electricity and magnetism, sound, and light.

COURSE GOALS:

  1. Introduce the central concepts of physics.
  2. Provide the conceptual framework to understand everyday phenomena.
  3. Improve lab skills and familiarity with lab equipment.
  4. Improve ability to organize and analyze quantitative data.
  5. Prepare for further science study at Head-Royce.

MATERIALS USED:

  1. Conceptual Physics, Hewitt
  2. Laboratory apparatus
  3. Teacher produced laboratory and classroom materials
  4. Multimedia
  5. Interactive Physics (software)

TEACHING STRATEGIES:

  1. Lecture and discussion
  2. Demonstrations and videos
  3. Experiments and laboratory activities
  4. Group discussion and interpretation of observations
  5. Lab reports
  6. Reading and problem assignments

METHODS OF EVALUATION:

  1. Formal lab write-ups
  2. Written tests and quizzes
  3. Questions/problem assignments
  4. Classroom observation

COURSE OUTLINE
The study of Physics is often divided in to two parts, classical mechanics and everything else. At the introductory level, waves, sound, and light are more readily understandable to the learner. Consequently we will address those topics first and cover mechanics second, and electricity and magnetism third. In terms of the Conceptual Physics text this means we will address the chapters in the following sequence: 1, 25-30, 2-9, 12-16, 32-37

BIOLOGY –  GRADE 9
Course Objectives:
College Biology is a college preparatory level course.  It is academically challenging so as to prepare my students for a college biology course.  The course is taught as a series of seven underlying themes.  Themes are major concepts that link facts and ideas together.  The themes will cover are energy, evolution, patterns of change, scale and structure, systems and interactions, unity and diversity, and stability.

Two main goals of College Biology are to come away well informed and enlightened about the living world around us.  The second goal is to convey some of the wonder and excitement felt by those who have been lucky enough to be involved in scientific work.

The College Biology course is taught with emphasis on ecology.  We will emphasize scientific method, biology as a science, basic chemistry, and ecology.  Evolutionary biology and then a selective survey of living things follow this.  It is hoped that students enter the course from a strong life science background.  College Biology moves at a medium pace.  Students must try to keep up.  Some work must be learned by the students on their own time.  As this is an academic course students must be in class as much as possible and make up all work when absent from class.

Textbook:  Holt McDougal  BIOLOGY

Exams/Projects/Quizzes/Homework/Grading:

  • Exams:  Exams are given at the end of a chapter.  Exams will always be announced.
  • Projects:  One major research paper will be assigned during the school year.  In addition to the research paper additional projects will be assigned.
  • Quizzes:  Approximately one quiz per week on the topics being studied.  Quizzes may or may not be announced.
  • Homework:  Homework in the form of reading, writing, and study assignments will be assigned daily except Fridays.  Homework will be approximately 30 minutes.
  • Grading:  Grading is an ongoing process based on percentages.  Every homework, quiz test, project or report is graded on a percentage.  At the end of each quarter the grade is determined according to school policy.  Student grades will be reduced for disciplinary reasons.

CHEMISTRY:
Course Objectives:

Chemistry is a college preparatory level course.  It is academically challenging so as to prepare my students for a college chemistry course.  In this course students will use the metric system, scientific notation, significant figures, and scientific calculators to solve measurement and conversion problems.  Students will recognize and describe the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions as part of matter.  We will have an understanding of the periodic table.  We will be able to write and balance chemical equations.  We will be able to apply an understanding of chemical concepts to select issues in human health and the environment.  Students will perform laboratory experiments in basic chemistry to reinforce their understanding of chemical concepts using the scientific method, with an emphasis on the chemistry of daily life.

Two main goals of Chemistry are to come away well informed and enlightened about the living world around us and how chemistry interacts with it.  The second goal is to convey some of the wonder and excitement felt by those who have been lucky enough to be involved in scientific work.

The Chemistry course is taught with emphasis on basic chemistry.  We will emphasize scientific method and basic chemistry.  It is hoped that students enter the course from a good science background.  Chemistry moves at a medium pace.  Students must try to keep up.  Some work must be learned by the students on their own time.  As this is an academic course students must be in class as much as possible and make up all work when absent from class.

Periods per week:  5
Prerequisites:  None

Text:  Prentice Hall Chemistry, Wilbraham, Stanley, Matta, and Waterman; Prentice Hall Publisher
FORENSIC SCIENCE:
COURSE OUTLINE:
I.    Introduction

  • a.    Scientific Process
  • b.    Basic Biology
  • c.    Basic Chemistry

II.    Securing the crime scene.
III.    Crime scene field procedures for collection of evidence.

  • a.    Approaching
  • b.    Preserving
  • c.    Processing

IV.    Types of evidence

  • a.    Testimonial
  • b.    Documentary
  • c.    Demonstrative
  • d.    Physical

V.    Handling of physical evidence

  • a.    Evidence collection and laboratory analysis
  1. blood (droplet patterns, type, Rh factor)
  2. semen
  3. hair
  4. fibers/threads
  5. glass
  6. paint
  7. fingerprint
  8. firearms
  9. handwriting
  10. arson
  11. document forgery
  • b.    Analysis of evidence

VI.    Science of fingerprinting

  • a.    History
  • b.    Lifting fingerprints
  1. plastic
  2. visible
  3. latent
  • c.    Chemical treatment

VII.    Pathology

  • a.    Determination of cause of death
  • b.    Time of death
  1. rigor mortis
  2. liver mortis
  3. Tardeau’s spots
  4. stomach contents
  5. vitreous potassium
  6. skeletal decomposition
  • c.    Inferring weapon type
  • d.    Homicide vs. suicide
  • e.    Establishing identity of the deceased
  • f.    Effect of trauma or pre-existing conditions on the remains
  • g.    Autopsy
  1. asphyxia indicators
  2. wound examination
  • h.    Handling the cadaver

VIII.    Ballistics

  • a.    External ballistics
  1. bullet paths
  2. entry and exit wounds
  • b.    Internal ballistics
  1. powder basics
  2. hacksaw effect

IX.    Forensic psychiatry

  • a.    Profiling
  • b.    Mental defect

X.    Forensic entomology

  • a.   Organisms used for analysis
  • b.    Infestation timelines
  • c.    Stages of decomposition post mortem
  • d.    Insect succession in bodies
  1. on land
  2. in water
  3. effect of chemicals in the body

XI.      Environmental profiling

  • a.    Zoology
  • b.    Botany
  • c.    Microbiology
  • d.    Palynology (pollen grains, etc.)
  • e.    Analytical protocols

XII.    Activities

  • a.    Field trip to a forensics lab.
  • b.    Crime scene simulations and evidence processing
  • c.    Role playing crime re-enactment based on evidence
  • d.    Role playing presenting evidence to build a case against a suspect
  • e.    Guest speakers on various aspects of forensics
  • f.    Computer activities using online case studies and data bank to use deductive process in assessing criminal behavior
  • g.    Creation of a portfolio of all topics covered in class

XIII.    Resources and materials